Getting ready for the calving rush – Noldy Rust

I was aiming to write this blog on the shortest day, but that was on the 22nd of June, and it came and went before I knew it. We are now two weeks past that already! Wow, two weeks past the shortest day, which means only 84 days to go until daylight saving kicks in. 84 days! Doesn’t seem like very long does it, but it will be 84 days of busy, busy and more busyness for most dairy farmers as calving looms or indeed is already underway for some. As I write this, I see Sam with his coat on following half a dozen cows to the dairy for milking. Yep, it seems to have started here. But more on that later.

I can’t speak for everyone, but the long, dry summer/autumn and sustained poor growth right through until early May had us worried about feed cover going into winter. Well, so much for that. Why worry, it doesn’t change anything, and often what we fear doesn’t happen anyway. We often get good growth after a long dry spell, with nitrogen build-up in the soil etc etc, but this year, at our place at least, it has been extreme. We have had good May growth in other years, but the growth right through May and June this year was phenomenal. A kind winter to date has certainly set most of us up for calving, with stock in good condition and plenty of cover on hand. And what about the ease of farming? Cows haven’t been stood off many times at all so far, which is such a contrast to last year. However, things can, and will, change, most of us think that winter is still coming, but no point in worrying about it is there??

Out on the farm, it’s been pretty much business as usual, with the normal winter maintenance jobs being carried out, plus a few extra little projects. The favourable June meant some of the planned digger work that was due was able to be carried out with ease and little mess. Our cows used to have to cross the tanker loop to graze two paddocks and new regulations meant that this was no longer acceptable, meaning a new track had to be formed to enable the cows to bypass the tanker circle. Fair enough, rules are rules, we better get that done…. But we all know, diggers are such an asset on a farm, I’m sure we’re all the same when we get one onsite for a day’s work….four days later, and a heap of jobs done that weren’t planned. I mean, I should have stayed away and turned my phone off, instead of taking a call every few hours from Sam saying things like “While he’s here, can we just ….”

And all the carnage the digger creates just leads to more things to do! I mean, I thought our little storage shed was fine…..ok it was a bit old and the door didn’t shut, and it had been hit by trucks and knocked off it’s foundations and was full of rats, but the roof didn’t leak cos the moss on it was so dense, and it owed me nothing! However, it was deemed to be an eyesore by everyone that was asked, so the digger driver didn’t have to be asked twice to become a demolition expert and crushed our little icon in no time. Ok, now what? We needed a new one of course! Mind you that was the fun part. Sam and I spent some time at the fieldays looking at options and finally agreed on a replacement which will be sited in a better position, away from trucks and rats and moss and things!

Speaking of fieldays, I don’t know about all of you guys, but I think it’s such a neat event, wouldn’t miss it for the world! Such a great avenue to check out new things, have breakfast with the bank, catch up with people, get new info, catch up with more people, have lunch with another bank, and come back the next day for food from another bank, and a pie from Ballance, not to mention a muffin from FMG…the list goes on. I had to go there for three days this year as I didn’t want to miss the breakfast at Swap’s, plus I still had to go the Good George tent to watch the tractor pull, although this wasn’t straight after breakfast I might add!

Back on the farm, we’re looking at putting rubber on our feedpad for cow comfort. We checked this out at the fieldays as well! We still put the old carpet in the yard which really helps, but rubber on the feedpad will be an extra level of care for animal welfare. Anyone I’ve talked to that has rubber on their concrete has said that they have no regrets. However, we scrape our pad, so now are also looking at floodwash options using green water. Got our info from Agfirst about this at the fieldays as well (in between banks!).

So now, day by day, it’s pretty much the calm before the storm, organising all the things needed for calving. Wood chip is in, calf feeders are cleaned, we’re putting water troughs in all our calf pens and buying whole grain calf meal (info sourced from SMASH fielday at Top Notch calves). Metabolic supplies are on hand, which we hope not to use as mag has been fed all winter, calving gear is sorted and the big bonus this year is….our lube pump! Can’t wait to help a cow to calve this year! The bonus of having an ‘interested vet with a big dog move to Wellington and take your daughter with him’ (see previous blogs) is that he left some of his stuff here for us to utilise. The broken-down motorcycle, the disused hut, the decrepit camping gear, well they’re not much chop. However, the LUBE PUMP, that’s another story! Both Sam and I are pretty excited about that! Those calves will pop out like a cork from a champagne bottle!

I wish you all well in the days ahead as we get into a new milking season. Enjoy the miracle of new birth and may the last calf that is born be as precious to you as the first one. It’s a bit like your kids…. The first one is really exciting but you sort of get used to it the more you have! This leads perfectly into my closing comment. Our youngest daughter happens to be a teacher who is now happier as they got a pay rise. But that’s another story. The Principal at her school is leaving this term after many years. He gave them all a parting gift which was lovely. They all got a bag with the school logo on! Her one was personalised….(see photo)

Nga mihi tin koto. Toru Wha.