Getting ready for the calving rush – Noldy Rust

I was aiming to write this blog on the shortest day, but that was on the 22nd of June, and it came and went before I knew it. We are now two weeks past that already! Wow, two weeks past the shortest day, which means only 84 days to go until daylight saving kicks in. 84 days! Doesn’t seem like very long does it, but it will be 84 days of busy, busy and more busyness for most dairy farmers as calving looms or indeed is already underway for some. As I write this, I see Sam with his coat on following half a dozen cows to the dairy for milking. Yep, it seems to have started here. But more on that later.

I can’t speak for everyone, but the long, dry summer/autumn and sustained poor growth right through until early May had us worried about feed cover going into winter. Well, so much for that. Why worry, it doesn’t change anything, and often what we fear doesn’t happen anyway. We often get good growth after a long dry spell, with nitrogen build-up in the soil etc etc, but this year, at our place at least, it has been extreme. We have had good May growth in other years, but the growth right through May and June this year was phenomenal. A kind winter to date has certainly set most of us up for calving, with stock in good condition and plenty of cover on hand. And what about the ease of farming? Cows haven’t been stood off many times at all so far, which is such a contrast to last year. However, things can, and will, change, most of us think that winter is still coming, but no point in worrying about it is there??

Out on the farm, it’s been pretty much business as usual, with the normal winter maintenance jobs being carried out, plus a few extra little projects. The favourable June meant some of the planned digger work that was due was able to be carried out with ease and little mess. Our cows used to have to cross the tanker loop to graze two paddocks and new regulations meant that this was no longer acceptable, meaning a new track had to be formed to enable the cows to bypass the tanker circle. Fair enough, rules are rules, we better get that done…. But we all know, diggers are such an asset on a farm, I’m sure we’re all the same when we get one onsite for a day’s work….four days later, and a heap of jobs done that weren’t planned. I mean, I should have stayed away and turned my phone off, instead of taking a call every few hours from Sam saying things like “While he’s here, can we just ….”

And all the carnage the digger creates just leads to more things to do! I mean, I thought our little storage shed was fine…..ok it was a bit old and the door didn’t shut, and it had been hit by trucks and knocked off it’s foundations and was full of rats, but the roof didn’t leak cos the moss on it was so dense, and it owed me nothing! However, it was deemed to be an eyesore by everyone that was asked, so the digger driver didn’t have to be asked twice to become a demolition expert and crushed our little icon in no time. Ok, now what? We needed a new one of course! Mind you that was the fun part. Sam and I spent some time at the fieldays looking at options and finally agreed on a replacement which will be sited in a better position, away from trucks and rats and moss and things!

Speaking of fieldays, I don’t know about all of you guys, but I think it’s such a neat event, wouldn’t miss it for the world! Such a great avenue to check out new things, have breakfast with the bank, catch up with people, get new info, catch up with more people, have lunch with another bank, and come back the next day for food from another bank, and a pie from Ballance, not to mention a muffin from FMG…the list goes on. I had to go there for three days this year as I didn’t want to miss the breakfast at Swap’s, plus I still had to go the Good George tent to watch the tractor pull, although this wasn’t straight after breakfast I might add!

Back on the farm, we’re looking at putting rubber on our feedpad for cow comfort. We checked this out at the fieldays as well! We still put the old carpet in the yard which really helps, but rubber on the feedpad will be an extra level of care for animal welfare. Anyone I’ve talked to that has rubber on their concrete has said that they have no regrets. However, we scrape our pad, so now are also looking at floodwash options using green water. Got our info from Agfirst about this at the fieldays as well (in between banks!).

So now, day by day, it’s pretty much the calm before the storm, organising all the things needed for calving. Wood chip is in, calf feeders are cleaned, we’re putting water troughs in all our calf pens and buying whole grain calf meal (info sourced from SMASH fielday at Top Notch calves). Metabolic supplies are on hand, which we hope not to use as mag has been fed all winter, calving gear is sorted and the big bonus this year is….our lube pump! Can’t wait to help a cow to calve this year! The bonus of having an ‘interested vet with a big dog move to Wellington and take your daughter with him’ (see previous blogs) is that he left some of his stuff here for us to utilise. The broken-down motorcycle, the disused hut, the decrepit camping gear, well they’re not much chop. However, the LUBE PUMP, that’s another story! Both Sam and I are pretty excited about that! Those calves will pop out like a cork from a champagne bottle!

I wish you all well in the days ahead as we get into a new milking season. Enjoy the miracle of new birth and may the last calf that is born be as precious to you as the first one. It’s a bit like your kids…. The first one is really exciting but you sort of get used to it the more you have! This leads perfectly into my closing comment. Our youngest daughter happens to be a teacher who is now happier as they got a pay rise. But that’s another story. The Principal at her school is leaving this term after many years. He gave them all a parting gift which was lovely. They all got a bag with the school logo on! Her one was personalised….(see photo)

Nga mihi tin koto. Toru Wha.

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Tasmanian reunions – Graham Smith

The season ended early for me with drying off on the 26th April. The dry summer/autumn encouraged this decision, and I feel it was the right one, with covers now over 2500 two thirds of the way through May.

For the record, final figures were 28,759 kg solids, 368 kg per cow, and 1027 kg per hectare. Although well down on last season, I feel profitability will be similar, or better, because I managed to cut right back on PKE input. The girls are looking good and I am already looking forward to calving and the prospect of all season OAD.

Travel was in our plans once again. This time to Tasmania for 6 days for a Lincoln Dip. Ag. 1975 reunion and tour. We started in Hobart and the highlight there was a visit to Lark distillery where we were taken through the process of whiskey making. We tasted the product as it went through its various phases. One interesting aspect was that all the employees were under 30 years, except for the main whiskey maker and he was only in his early 30s! The product was good and sort of put us in a good mood for the rest of the trip!

We were lucky that one of our number is a farm adviser in Tassie, so as we travelled he discussed the methods of farming, the soil and climate to give us a close understanding of conditions.

We visited a 60,000 acres sheep and beef farm, well run with a run-off in the highlands. The highlands are cold and stony and are used in the summer when there is more rainfall at elevation and no snow. The east side of the highlands, which is dry, hard country, is in marked contrast to the west, which had lush bush, and as we went down into the valleys, we saw plenty of good-looking land supporting dairy farms.

We next stayed at Devonport, which is the ferry terminal to cross the Bass Strait to Melbourne, a 12-hour trip. We visited an opium poppy farm and were intrigued by the security and the uniqueness of the crop. The opium is retrieved from the shell of the flower capsule, so it takes a lot of flowers to make up a kilo! The poppy seed is sold for our buns and for bird seed.

Trowunna wildlife sanctuary was a chance to be close to and pat a Tasmanian devil and a wombat, and we learnt about their life cycle and survival. We viewed echidna and ran out of time to walk through a snake enclosure, such a pity ( not! ).

The next visit was to the only salmon farm attached to land, in the Tamar river, which has huge tidal flows to maintain the health of the fish.

Back to Hobart for the final day, and just enough time to visit the Salamanca market, which is very big. The day was heating up and by the time we boarded the plane it was 40 degrees and a very hot wind. I could then see why irrigating during the day would be an exercise in futility!

As you can see, with all my travels not much milking was done by me, but my relief milker was doing well. To put myself out of contention for the rest of the season I then had a full knee replacement, from which I am still recovering.

Since then I have given another talk for SMASH at Awakeri, and finally spent some time on the farm.

Other things have been happening, but I will save that for the next instalment.

Roll on the Fieldays!

Drought is Broken – Brian Frost

It’s been a long time coming but finally the rain has arrived, hopefully not too late as we are very short of grass. With a bit of luck we can still see a pretty good finish to this season – we do need some good growing conditions over the next two months to set up well for the winter, so here’s hoping things go to plan.

It’s been a couple of months since the last blog, so there is a bit to catch up on. Frostie has been working hard on the runoff and the main farm with fencing, drainage, maize silage, and many other things. Mrs. Frostie has been working close to full time in various jobs. Stafford (18) has been working and saving hard. Now he has headed off to Queenstown to DTS (Discipleship Training School) run by YWAM (Youth with a Mission). He will be studying for three months (and enjoying all Queenstown has to offer, like bungy jumping and snow, while he’s there) and then spending three months on a mission somewhere in the Asia/Pacific region (not sure where yet). Siobhan (20) is in the process of deciding on a placement for Camp America. Devon (16) is working hard and fundraising for a school mission trip to Fiji in July. Ella (daughter-in-law) graduated as a registered nurse and has started her new job at the hospital. Mrs. Frostie’s dad is getting married again (very exciting). Frostie, Mrs. Frostie, and Devon are off to Oz on Monday for a visit with family and to visit the farms we have interests in. And that’s just a few of the things happening and changes going on!

On the Farm

There are currently 376 cows on the farm and runoff – all grazing 1 – 1.2 ha/day (55-65 day round). 320 milkers are grazing ⅓ paddock at night and ⅓ paddock during the day (1 ha/day), plus each cow is getting 6 kg meal, ½ kg molasses, and 5 kg DM maize silage. 44 dry cows are also on farm getting maize. A zinc mineral mix is going through the water.

Production to date is 156,312 kg MS compared with 139,626 kg MS at the same time last year. Current production is 6.3 – 6.5 kg MS/ha/day and 1.45 – 1.55 kg MS/cow/day. The cow condition is 4.6 – 4.7 for the milkers and 5.5+ for the dry cows.

71 autumn cows have calved so far – with not many issues – just a little milk fever last week. There are just 44 cows left to calve over the next five weeks.

The continued dry weather means we are planning on dropping out some cows. In early May we will cull 15 – 20 and all the low producing cows will be dried off and sent to the run off.

Feed

The grazing round extended a little as soon as the turnips finished and the maize was increased. The plan is to be around 60 days going through May and a 74 day round when all the new grass paddocks are back in the grazing round. We are starting the grass silage to help get the residuals lifting ASAP.

The average pasture cover is around 1,600 kg DM/ha – on the ‘normal’ winter equation. The pasture cover targets for the next six weeks are 1,600 – 1,700 kg DM/ha in late April and 2,000 – 2,100 kg DM/ha in late May.

Supplements

  • P8: 765,000 litres in total so far this season. We have had the last delivery for the season so have changed to molasses now.
  • Molasses: 15 tonnes arrived on 16th April and will be fed at ½ kg/cow/day through the next 2 – 3 months – until the P8 becomes available again.
  • Meal: 624 tonnes so far this season. The mix is still 90% PKE and 10% tapioca. The feeding rate got up to 7 kg/cow/day while the P8 was being fed, but at the moment, with the change to molasses, the cows are eating a bit less.
  • The maize started on 27th March at 3 kg DM/cow/day and built up to 5 kg DM/cow/day when the turnips finished.

Cropping / new grass

The turnips finished on 2nd April and all of the turnip paddocks were sown into new grass on 12th April. Some of these paddocks also had drainage work done. The chicory paddocks have been undersown, with just two paddocks left to get done, and there is one more paddock for cropping next spring that needs to be undersown.

Fertiliser

Two tonnes of SustaiN (urea) was applied in March and 0.6 tonne in April. The aim is to finish the whole farm with urea before starting a round of PhaSedN (120 – 150 kg/ha) through May and June.

On the run off

Currently on the run off 102 spring 2017 heifers, 1 dry cow, 3 beefies and 4 older extras are getting maize plus pasture (70 of these have been sold and leave in early May). 4 empty spring 2017 heifers, 16 autumn calves, and 111 spring calves are also getting maize and pasture.

No fertiliser has been applied since December. PhaSedN will get applied over this block through May at 120 – 150 kg/ha.

All of the new grass has been sown – with the permanent paddocks getting a top-up as the continued dry weather caused a huge loss of pasture. 2 ha of annual is left to be done in next spring paddocks and 3 more paddocks will be undersown with cheap seed. There is still heaps of maize on hand so this will be used to balance out the pasture – hopefully holding the round to get the pasture building as quickly as possible.

Autumn Celebrations – Noldy Rust

My calendar seems in a bit of disarray at the moment as we work ourselves through 2 weeks of days on, days off, days on, days off, causing me to struggle a bit trying to remember what day it is. I do know that it’s ANZAC day today as this is such a well-advertised and poignant time in the life of our nation, and Easter has just been and gone, as is evident by the ever-diminishing basket of Easter eggs sitting in the middle of our dining room table. I am also aware that today is our wedding anniversary, many years of wedded bliss behind us now, the number a bit too scary to mention! I look back with a certain amount of smugness however, as the day we picked to get married is always going to be a national holiday, which is great in itself, but the real advantage in having an ANZAC day wedding is that it’s virtually impossible to forget our wedding anniversary. Haven’t forgotten yet, and long may it continue! To date, Bev has never missed out on being showered with all sorts of reminders of that memorable day, many years ago!! She certainly is a lucky woman!

As I wrote my last blog, we were celebrating some much-needed rainfall and looking forward to positive growth rates, and, if I remember correctly, I may have mentioned autumn silage, bloat, and the absence of facial eczema. I was right on one count, but one count only. Fortunately, we have seen no evidence of eczema to date which is great news. However, growth has been slow as the rain was sporadic at best, and only in the last few days have we seen some really decent rain, and this, coupled with cooler days, is giving us hope that we still have time to lift covers going into winter while we carry on milking. No sign of bloat, which is great, but certainly no surplus grass to even think of autumn silage.

We were discussing milking frequency in my last blog as well. I wasn’t sure whether to consider 16-hour milking, or even once a day, and I was thinking that I must bring this up with Sam at some stage. That ‘some stage’ actually eventuated rather quickly owing to Sam reading my blog and front-footing the conversation! At least it means he reads it I guess! After much discussion, we decided that the only way of finding out is by trying, so we bit the bullet and went onto once a day milking. Now this is a big decision for me as we don’t normally do this until we are drying off. However, the cows were down to about 1.15 kg MS/cow/day so we thought that we wouldn’t lose much. I heeded some great advice I heard years ago from Pete Morgan. They always go onto OAD milking sometime in December, but they time it with a period that the cows go into really good grass, usually silage paddocks or the like. This gave me the confidence to make the decision, as we had been on basically a non-grass diet for a month or so but were just speeding up the round again as we had reasonable cover in front of us. Feeding grass again, plus maize and a PKE blend with a bit of canola, seemed to do the trick. We’ve been on OAD about a month now and although there was an initial drop in production, they did lift again and are still doing over 1 kg MS/cow/day. And boy are they in good condition! And is Sam happy! He’s got a bit more time to do other things on and off the farm now, and that’s got to be a good thing. We’re sitting on about a 65 day round and still feeding plenty of maize while we try and build the cover some more in anticipation of the heifers coming home shortly.

The long dry has resulted in a scarcity of winter grazing so we made the decision to buy a bit more maize in, as the heifers will be home earlier than usual and there may be more cows on at home prior to calving. We already had 250 tonnes of maize silage on hand after the harvest but another 50 tonnes came up nearby, so I just couldn’t resist. Maize on hand is like money in the bank, you can never have too much! And I don’t even work for Pioneer anymore! We used to always bring in some grass silage in spring but with the extra maize now I’m thinking that this won’t happen this year.

On the home front, we had an impending wedding when I wrote my last blog. I can happily say that this is now behind us and we have a happily married couple that were so fortunate to have a fantastic wedding day with all going extremely well. A big tick for that day to all involved.

Two down, one to go, although the ‘one to go’ has just today made the big move and left the nest for the second time, heading down to Wellington as she follows the ‘interested vet with the big dog’ (see previous blogs) and begins a new life down there. Never a dull moment in life especially when you have kids, no matter what age! Speaking of kids, daughter number one is about to produce grandchild number two, so it’s all a bit of a waiting game as to when this will happen. Nana is on standby for childminding and meals and all that stuff that nanas do, and I’ve made sure there’s a beer in the fridge, and a tipple in the cupboard, for when the need arises to celebrate the arrival of junior!

On that happy note, it’s about that time now, as the shadows lengthen and dusk draws near, for us to consider our plans for the evening. Seeing as I brought her a coffee in bed accompanied with an Easter egg, I’m guessing that my loving wife will no doubt have plans to take me out to dinner to celebrate and commemorate, both the ANZACs and our wedding day.

Finally, some rain! Noldy Rust

I feel in rather a buoyant mood today for several reasons including, but not limited to: autumn rain, maize, bacon, craft beer and boys…..Often we put ourselves under pressure by having a list of things we need to do, but can’t find time to do, or maybe don’t want to do; or things we want to have, and can’t have; or things we know are coming, but just won’t get here. That sounds like a bit of a mouthful, but it’s been a bit like that over the past month for yours truly.

How buoyant do you feel, when after months of hot, dry weather, the autumn rains turn up? With the countryside looking similar to the deserts of the Sahara, minus the camels, and nomads, and all that other stuff you get over there (I haven’t been there yet), the welcome relief of 26 ml can’t help but lighten the mood. This in turn inspires enthusiasm for those tasks that have been on standby for some time, such as blog writing, household repairs, and general catching up on things that are long overdue. As a result, these wonderful rains, coupled with the fact that the maize has just been harvested, the bacon’s on its way (thanks to the sacrifice of Mr and Mrs Piggy), and the impending wedding of daughter number three, necessitating a girls’ hen weekend away, have led to a general feeling of euphoria as once the chores are done, there will be time for unimpeded boys’ activities, including, at the very least, rugby, craft beer, and general scornful disarray in the next 24 hours or so.

Ok, enough of the planning ahead, let’s get back to the situation prior to the rains. After a summer to beat all summers last year, I guess we all kind of guessed that she’d be a bit tough this year. When you think of the copious amount of rain that fell throughout November and December, it’s not a surprise that once it stopped raining, it stopped for good. Unlike the big dry in 2008/09, this year saw most of us go into the dry with good stocks of supplements. For us it’s just been a case of storing up supplements, enjoying not feeding out throughout January and early February, then getting into it with a vengeance once the farm had been chewed out. We identified two paddocks that needed regrassing and decided these were the standoff sacrifice paddocks to use in order to avoid overgrazing the rest of the farm. Consequently, Sam has had the cows on a 300 plus day round for almost a month now, only using about .15 ha per day. The clean break was really just to feed out on. Feeding out four times a day is a little time consuming, but should be worth the effort, as pastures will be in a good state to fully rejuvenate now that they’ve had a drink. Plus, Sam loves his job, enjoys driving the tractor, and is especially pleased that we don’t have cab tractors as this would slow down his getting on and off. I always knew that he’d see my logic sooner or later!

Grass silage, with PKE and canola in the mix, plus some maize, and 7.5 m2 per cow of Sahara-type pasture is a diet to behold, and I’m sure the envy of many a cow….. well, they seem happy enough. The FEI is an interesting one though. No worries feeding 3-4 kg of PKE in spring with lots of grass, but things change a bit when the diet is made up of less grass and lots of silage and maize. There were times that we had to cut right back, even stop feeding PKE for a day, just to bring the FEI back on track. The canola does help to dilute the mix a bit and adds some protein.

Going forward, it’s the big debate of milking times. We traditionally stay twice a day because I don’t have to milk (hang on, did I say that?), no, I mean because of SCC challenges, cows drying themselves off early etc etc. Plus, what would Sam do with all his time? I guess he could feed out another couple of times…. Seriously, I’m thinking that once we have a bit of grass and the high SCC cows are gone (there aren’t many) we may look at options of three times in two days, or once a day milking. I guess the decision will be made easier if I get called in to do some relief milking…

When planning ahead in the autumn profit is at the forefront of our thinking (as it should always be) so we are always thinking about the cost of feed, the level of payout, and other factors, such as cow condition and the cost of weddings. As mentioned earlier, daughter number three is to be married in a few weeks so this adds another dimension to the need for profit – as weddings are a joy to behold, but very costly! However, the investment in the wedding of daughter number one a few years back has paid dividends, as they are enjoying the benefits of married life, and have provided us with one beautiful granddaughter to date plus another baby is on the way (and he’s a mechanic and we all have cars that need looking after). An investment in a fruitful marriage is well worth the money, even if it involves hens’ parties, and things like that, that us blokes struggle to understand. Speaking of which, my valuable boy time in the absence of the female friends is slipping on by and even though I am feeling buoyant, my commitment to writing is fading as my mind strays towards rugby and craft beer. And to add a bit more pressure, I have just taken a call from a prospective purchaser, wanting to view a property that I’ve listed. Oh, the joys of real estate. With this in mind now, I have totally switched off from the farm and all things to do with cows as I focus on rugby, craft beer and real estate, but not in that order! I need to sign off in order to meet my prospective buyer at the appropriate time, after which I will be able to regain some buoyancy as I concentrate on the plans for the rest of the afternoon that involve craft beer and rugby!

I’ll be back in touch in a few weeks talking about autumn surpluses, bloat, no facial eczema and two down, one to go….but that’s another story!!

Travel tales – Graham Smith

February has brought plenty of heat to our operation, and any areas with a stone or sand base are now dead. Even my lucerne block is wilting and with growth rates at 4 kg/day silage has become the order of the day. With a 36 day round, I still have a little deferred grass, but it is all crispy. Production is around 0.95 kg MS/cow, and is down 23% for the month. Admittedly, last season was one out of the box here with record production, and I fed PKE right through until April last year. So, stopping PKE in September depressed production by 3% and the dry has done the rest. In the season to date I am down 8%, but so are my expenses.

Fortunately, a very good spring has seen four cuts off my leases for silage, with the first three into the pit and the last cut into bales. Cow condition is good at 4.7, but the empty rate at 14% is not. Still, empties are less than last year, and this gives me some leeway to set up for next season. The plan is to go whole season OAD, and with no cows with a cell count over 170,000, and nothing due to calve in September, all things point to a good start. How the cows respond is another story.

Lately, travel has been on the itinerary. Tess and I went to Canada in early January for a wedding, and decided to make a trip of it. We flew direct to Chicago and then hopped to Toronto. A visit to Niagara Falls was a highlight, and then it was on to Québec City for the wedding. It was cold, -16°C, but picturesque. On the third day a storm hit, and it went down to minus -33°C, now that was cold! We ventured out and found it survivable with the right clothing. The locals were even complaining, but it was noticeable that business continued.

We then flew to Vancouver to stay with family and enjoyed ice-skating (a first for Tess), and snow-shoeing, a first for both of us. Mountain views were outstanding and even up on the mountains it was noticeably warmer than the east coast. Also there were things still growing due to the better climate.

Then on to San Francisco: the Golden Gate Bridge, Alcatraz and Muir Park redwoods. These trees were 500 years old, tall, and well looked after. We also visited Fisherman’s Wharf, enjoyed the market, and witnessed a large pro-life march down the main street. This was interesting to us for its size and the number of police on duty.Onwards to Las Vegas, which bedazzled us with its wealth and exorbitance. We enjoyed one of the shows, had a good look around, and toured to see the Grand Canyon (and grand it is), and the Hoover Dam. It was also the only time on the trip we saw any livestock. These were horned sheep, which in truth looked like goats to us. Las Vegas is in the desert, so the motorways, instead of having shrubs and plantings on their edges, used concrete walls or various colours and grades of metal. The desert itself had plenty of hardy shrubs growing and there was a sprinkling of homes throughout, with the odd village clustered around a spring.

Lastly, Hawaii on the way home, where we visited Pearl Harbour, the Lyon Arboretum, and Waikiki Beach. We felt that we could have spent more time in each of those places and seen more, still, that gives us the excuse to do it again!!

Finally, I was asked by SMASH to go to the South Island and visit Takaka and Karamea to talk about diversification; its potential and how that is affecting my operation. Succession also was on the agenda, and I found a lot of people in the same situation of “what next?”. I really enjoyed their hospitality and sharing experiences. Talking of experiences, the flight from Wellington to Takaka and on to Karamea was in a small 7-seater plane. We wore earphones that enabled us to follow the pilot talking to the control tower and hear how many other planes were also in the air. The weather was stable and it made for an enjoyable flight over the Sounds and upper South Island.

2019 begins – Brian Frost

It’s been a long time between blogs and lots has been happening. The rain has been wonderful and is keeping the grass growing at exponential rates, which is a wonderful change for this time of the year.

The end of 2018 was busy with normal farming life but also Mrs. Frostie took on a few other jobs like: receptionist, part-time chairside assistant for an orthodontist, and project manager for a build and shift of an engineering company, all while continuing with DairyNZ, being busy on various committees, and doing some farm work where needed. The younger two Frosties had their study leave and exams, so needless to say, we were all ready for a break so all ended up taking turns milking the cows over Christmas and New Year. We are all back at our other jobs now so no time for the beach this year! Frostie has had the opportunity to go fishing a few times (yum!!) and there have been trips to the lake for skiing.

bf water skiing jan19

On the farm

On the farm front there are 361 cows on the milking platform and the run off and production to date is 91,401 kg MS, compared with 82,116 kg MS at the same time last year. Current production is 8.5 – 8.9 kg MS/ha/day and 1.75 – 1.85 kg MS/cow/day. Cow condition is lifting at 4.2 – 4.3.

Magnesium, sodium and calcium are still being added with the meal and the trace mineral mix is also going through the water.

Feed

We have been trying the SPACE pasture cover readings but for the last few months these have been reading very low compared to the reality of what is on farm, so we haven’t been relying on these reports. The pasture cover targets are 2,600 – 2,700 kg DM/ha in late January.

Crops

The 24 ha of maize at the run off looks great.

Also, 7 – 8 paddocks were put into grass silage at the run off on 22nd November and we have another four paddocks currently shut up and ready to harvest.

The first grazing of chicory started on 5th December and when the turnips start (about now), the chicory will be added as a replacement for the pasture area to feed with the turnips. At this feeding rate we expect the cows to get around 5 kg DM/cow/day of turnips and the crops to last through to late March.

bf calves jan19

Spring mating

The bulls came out of the heifers on 11th December. AB started for the cows on 23rd October and finished on 4th December. 259 cows (94%) were mated in 21 days and 100% by the end of mating. 108 cows returned to AB meaning 61% didn’t return. Pregnancy testing is booked in for 22nd January.